@TREND

English (Español a continuación)

This function allows to project a time series. Its structure consists of 9 elements:

  • @TREND (A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I)

As we will see below, some elements are optional, but if they are not reported, their place must be kept with a “,”

For example, if element B is not informed, the function remains:

  • @TREND (A ,, C, D, E, F, G, H, I)

“A”: series of historical data that serve as the basis for the projection.

  • For example: @LIST (“2016” -> Jan, “2017” -> Dec)

“B”: is optional; refers to the moment in time to which each historical data corresponds. If it is not reported, it is considered that the first data corresponds to the 1st moment (Jan / 16), the second to the 2nd moment (Feb / 16) and so on.

  • We would use this element if, for example, we do not have a complete time series (for example, Jan / 16, Mar / 16 …) so we have to tell Essbase to which period corresponds each data (1,3 …).
  • If this element is reported, a value must be assigned to each data of the historical series.
  • In the examples we will see, we will not report this element (we are going to consider that the historical data correspond to complete time series).

“C”: is optional; allows correcting the weighting of specific data of the historical series; It is used when there is anomalous data that can distort the projection.

  • If not reported, all data receive the same weighting.
  • If we want to weight a data more than the average, we will give it a value > 1.
  • If we want to weight a data less than the average, we will give it a value < 1.
  • If this element is reported, weight must be assigned to each data in the historical series: for example, if we have 12 historical data corresponding to the period Jan / 16 – Dec 16, and the data corresponding to March is atypical and we want to weight it less (for example, half value), the element “C” would consist of the following list:
    • (1,1,0.5,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1)

“D”: it is optional, it records the differences between the historical data and the data that the model would estimate for that historical period.

Example: (Sales)

In this example, the blue line represents the historical data and the brown line represents the projection that the model calculates.

If we look at the historical period (green box), item “D” would show the difference in each month between the blue line and the brown line.

If this element “D” is reported, it must have the same number of members that the historical series.

  • For example: @LIST (“2016_error” -> Jan, “2017_error” -> Dec)

“E”: it is optional, it determines in what future moment in time we want to carry out the projection.

  • If it is not reported, it is understood that the projection begins from the period following the last of the historical data. If the historical data is @LIST (“2016” -> Jan, “2016” -> Dec) the projection would start in Jan / 2017.
  • Otherwise (for example, if we want to project from Jan / 2018), we must inform this.

A list must be included indicating the moment to which each projected data corresponds (considering that moment 1 is the next to the end of the historical series)

  • If the historical series goes from Jan / 16 to Dec / 16, time 1 would be Jan / 17.

For example, if we want to project the 12 months of 2018, this element “E” would consist of the following list (it has to include a value for each data we are projecting: if we project 12 months, it has to include 12 values, one for each month ).

  • (13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24)

“F”: with this element we indicate to Essbase where to place the projection:

For example, if we want to project the year 2017, we can place the projection at:

  • @LIST (“Year 2017” -> January, “Year 2017” -> December)

Or also:

  • @LIST (“Projection 2017” -> January, “Projection 2017” -> December)

“G”: indicates the statistical method that Essbase will use to perform the projection. Essbase offers 4 possibilities:

  • LR: linear regression
  • SES: Simple Exponential Smoothing
  • DES: Double Exponential smoothing
  • TES: Triple Exponential Smoothing

We will discuss these 4 methods later.

“H”: it is optional, it allows modifying the scales of the time moments recorded in the element “B” (applying logarithm, exponents, powers).

  • In our explanation we are not using this element; we will consider that the time period is continuous.
  • If this element is not informed in the function, it is not necessary to indicate it with a “,”.

“I”: is optional, it allows modifying the scales of the historical series data (applying logarithm, exponents, powers).

  • In our explanation we are not using this element; we are going to project the historical data without modifying its scales.
  • If this element is not informed in the function, it is not necessary to indicate it with a “,”.

Some considerations:

This function must be used in a calculation script: it cannot be included as a formula in an outline member.

In the calculation script, this function has to be associated with a member. For example:

  • Sales(
    • @TREND (…);
  • )

The historical data series and the projected series can have different numbers of elements:

  • We can have 12 historical data and project 6 future data, or 12, or 18, or 24 …

METHODS

Essbase offers 4 models. The use of one or another is determined by the analyst’s knowledge and the logic of the projected series.

A possible method for assessing the suitability of a model can be determined by the one that minimizes the mean square error “MSE” (sum of squared differences between the historical data and those that the model would project for this historical period).

  • The square root of the mean square error (“RMSE”) is often used.

I.- LR

Linear regression.

We apply the following function: (we have informed the elements “A”, “D”, “F” and “G”)

  • Sales(
    • @TREND (@LIST (“2016” -> Jan, “2017” -> Dec) ,,, @ LIST (“2016_err” -> Jan, “2017_err” -> Dec) ,, @ LIST (“2018_est” – > Jan, “2019_est” -> Dec), LR);
  • )

We upload the following data: (Sales)

Whose graphic representation is:

This function projects the following curve:

II.- SES

Simple exponential smoothing.

In models with exponential smoothing (single, double, or triple) the historical data is weighted in a decreasing way:

  • The further they move away from the present, the less they weigh in the calculation of the model.

The SES model estimates neither trend nor seasonality.

  • It should therefore be used to project historical series that show neither trend nor seasonality.

This method can carry an “a” parameter (optional) that applies to the absolute value of the data and determines how the weight of the historical values ​​decreases backwards.

  • The last data in the historical series is weighted “a”
  • The penultimate data is weighted “a” * (1 – “a”)
  • The antepenultimate data is weighted “a” * (1 – “a”) ^ 2

This parameter “a” can take values ​​between 0 and 1:

  • The higher its valu, the more weight receives the most recent historical data and the less the oldest ones.
  • The lower its value, the older values ​​gain weight in the estimate.

The analyst’s knowledge allows him to choose the value of “a” that defines a more acceptable projection model.

  • If this parameter is not reported, its default values is 0.2

If this parameter is reported, it is incorporated into the function after the model:

  • @TREND (,,,,,, SES, 0.5);

Let’s see how the weight of the historical data decrease depending of the value of this parameter “a” (considering a historical series with 12 values):

Let’s see an example of the application of this model:

We start with this historical data: (Sales)

We are going to apply two functions: the first with the default parameters:

  • Sales(
    • @TREND (@LIST (“2016” -> Jan, “2017” -> Dec) ,,, @ LIST (“2016_err” -> Jan, “2017_err” -> Dec) ,, @ LIST (“2018_est” – > Jan, “2019_est” -> Dec), SES);
  • )

And the second applying a parameter a = 0.8:

  • Sales(
    • @TREND (@LIST (“2016” -> Jan, “2017” -> Dec) ,,, @ LIST (“2016_err” -> Jan, “2017_err” -> Dec) ,, @ LIST (“2018_est” – > Jan, “2019_est” -> Dec), SES, 0.8);
  • )

Obtaining the following projections:

  • 1st function: Brown line
  • 2nd function: Gray line

III.- DES

Double exponential smoothing.

This method starts from the previous model but also takes into account the trend; it does not assess whether the historical series presents seasonality.

  • It should therefore be used to project historical series that show trends but not seasonality.

This method can incorporate 2 parameters; both can take values ​​between 0 and 1:

“a”: is similar to the previous model; if it is not reported, its default value is 0.2

“b”: measures the trend of the series; if it is not reported, its default value is 0.3

  • It works in a similar way as the parameter “a” but applied to the trend of the series: higher values ​​weigh more the most recent trend shown by the historical data, and lower values ​​allow the trend shown by the oldest data also participate in determining the trend of the series.

If these parameters are reported, they are included after the model:

  • @TREND (,,,,,, DES, 0.5,0.8);

Let’s see an example: we project the following data: (Sales)

We are going to apply two functions: the first with the default parameters:

  • Sales(
    • @TREND (@LIST (“2016” -> Jan, “2017” -> Dec) ,,, @ LIST (“2016_err” -> Jan, “2017_err” -> Dec) ,, @ LIST (“2018_est” – > Jan, “2019_est” -> Dec), DES);
  • )

And the second applying a parameter “a” = 0.1 and “b” = 0.5:

  • Sales(
    • @TREND (@LIST (“2016” -> Jan, “2017” -> Dec) ,,, @ LIST (“2016_err” -> Jan, “2017_err” -> Dec) ,, @ LIST (“2018_est” – > Jan, “2019_est” -> Dec), DES, 0.1,0,5);
  • )

Obtaining the following projections:

  • 1st function: Brown line
  • 2nd function: Gray line

To analyze the goodness of these estimates we can use the parameter RMSE (square root of the squared sum of the errors):

The first function:

The second function:

Although it is the expert who must assess the goodness of these estimates, the first function is closer to the historical data: the RMSE parameter is lower.

IV.- TES

Triple exponential smoothing.

This method starts from the previous one, but also incorporates seasonality.

  • It should therefore be used to project historical series that show trends and seasonality.

This method can incorporate the frequency of seasonality and 3 parameters (which can take values ​​between 0 and 1):

“T”: Frequency of seasonality: indicates the frequency with which seasonality occurs:

  • If the data are monthly and the seasonality is repeated every 12 months it would take the value 12, if it is repeated quarterly it would take the value 4 …

“a”: measures the absolute value of the data; if it is not reported, its default value is 0.2

  • It is similar to the previous model.

“b”: measures the trend of the series; if it is not reported, its default value is 0.5

  • It is similar to the previous model.

“c”: measures the seasonality of the series; if it is not reported, its default value is 0.1

  • It works in a similar way as the other two parameters but applied to the seasonality of the series: higher values ​​weigh more the seasonality shown in the most recent historical data, and lower values ​​allow the seasonality shown in the oldest data also participate in determining the projected seasonality of the series.

If these parameters are informed, they are included after the model:

  • @TREND (,,,,,, TES, 12,0.5,0.8,0.2);

Let’s see an example: we start from the following data: (Sales)

Which draw the following graph:

We see that it presents certain seasonality in March, so the TES model is applicable.

We are going to apply two functions: the first with the parameters “a” = 0.3 / “b” = 0.3 / “c” = 0.9 and “T” = 12:

  • Sales(
    • @TREND (@LIST (“2016” -> Jan, “2017” -> Dec) ,,, @ LIST (“2016_err” -> Jan, “2017_err” -> Dec) ,, @ LIST (“2018_est” – > Jan, “2019_est” -> Dec), TES, 12,0.3,0.3,0.9);
  • )

The second with the parameters “a” = 0.4 / “b” = 0.4 / “c” = 0.95 and “T” = 12:

  • Sales(
    • @TREND (@LIST (“2016” -> Jan, “2017” -> Dec) ,,, @ LIST (“2016_err” -> Jan, “2017_err” -> Dec) ,, @ LIST (“2018_est” – > Jan, “2019_est” -> Dec), TES, 12,0.4,0.4,0.95);
  • )

We have selected these sets of parameters after different tests until obtaining relatively logical projections. The model can be very sensitive to the values ​​of these parameters.

Obtaining the following projections:

  • 1st function: Brown line
  • 2nd function: Gray line

 To analyze the goodness of these estimates we can use the parameter RMSE:

The first function:

The second function:

Although it is the expert who must assess the goodness of these estimates, the second model is closer to the historical data: the RMSE parameter is lower.

Español

Esta función permite proyectar una serie temporal. Su estructura consta de 9 elementos:

  • @TREND(A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I)

Como veremos a continuación, algunos elementos son opcionales pero si no se informan hay que respetar su lugar marcándolo con una “,”

Por ejemplo, si el elemento B no es informado la función queda:

  • @TREND(A,,C,D,E,F,G,H,I)

“A”: serie de datos históricos que sirven de base a la proyección.

  • Por ejemplo: @LIST(“2016”->Ene,“2017”->Dic)

“B”: es opcional; hace referencia al momento temporal al que corresponde cada uno de los datos históricos. Si no se informa se considera que el primer dato corresponde al momento 1º (Ene/16), el segundo al momento 2º (Feb/16) y así sucesivamente

  • Utilizaremos este elemento, si por ejemplo, no tenemos una serie temporal completa (por ejemplo, ene/16, mar/16…) por lo que tendremos que indicarle a Essbase a qué momento corresponde cada dato (1,3…)
  • Si se informa este elemento hay que asignar un valor a cada dato de la serie histórica.
  • En los ejemplos que vamos a ver no vamos a informar este elemento (vamos a considerar que los datos históricos corresponden a series temporales completas).

“C”: es opcional; permite corregir la ponderación de datos concretos de la serie histórica; se utiliza cuando hay datos anómalos que pueden distorsionar la proyección.

  • Si no se cumplimenta todos los datos reciben la misma ponderación.
  • Si un dato lo queremos ponderar más que la media le daremos un valor > 1.
  • Si un dato lo queremos ponderar menos que la media le daremos un valor < 1.
  • SI se informa este elemento hay que asignarle ponderación a cada dato de la serie histórica: por ejemplo si tenemos 12 datos históricos correspondientes al periodo ene/16 – dic 16 y el dato de marzo es atípico y queremos ponderarlo menos (por ejemplo, la mitad), el elemento “C” consistirá en la siguiente lista:
    • (1,1,0.5,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1)

“D”: es opcional, recoge las diferencias entre los datos históricos y los datos que estimaría el modelo para ese periodo histórico.

Ejemplo:

En este ejemplo, la línea azul representa los datos históricos y la línea marrón la proyección que calcula el modelo.

Si nos fijamos en el periodo histórico (recuadro verde), el elemento “D” recogería la diferencia en cada mes entre la línea azul y la línea marrón.

Si se informa este elemento “D” tiene que tener el mismo número de miembros que la serie histórica.

  • Por ejemplo: @LIST(“2016_error”->Ene,“2017_error”->Dic)

“E”: es opcional, determina en qué momento futuro en el tiempo queremos realizar la proyección.

  • Si no se informa se entiende que la proyección comienza a partir del siguiente periodo al último de los datos históricos. Si los datos históricos son @LIST(“2016”->Ene,“2016”->Dic) la proyección comenzaría en ene/2017.
  • Si en cambio nos interesa comenzar a proyectar, por ejemplo desde ene/2018, hay que indicárselo a Essbase.

Hay que incluir una lista indicando el momento al que corresponde cada proyección (considerando que el momento 1 es el siguiente al final de la serie histórica)

  • Si la serie histórica va de Ene/16 a Dic/15, el momento 1 sería ene/17.

Por ejemplo, si queremos proyectar los 12 meses de 2018 este elemento “E” consistiría en la siguiente lista (tiene que incluir un valor por cada momento temporal que estamos proyectando: si proyectamos 12 meses, tiene que incluir 12 valores, uno por cada mes).

  • (13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24)

“F”: con este elemento indicamos a Essbase donde debe situar la proyección:

Por ejemplo, si queremos proyectar el año 2017 podemos decirle que la proyección la sitúe en:

  • @LIST(“Año 2017” -> Enero, “Año 2017” -> Diciembre)

O también:

  • @LIST(“Proyección 2017” -> Enero, “Proyección 2017” -> Diciembre)

“G”:  indica el método estadístico que va a utilizar Essbase para realizar la proyección. Essbase ofrece 4 posibilidades:

  • LR: regresión lineal
  • SES: Suavizado exponencial simple
  • DES: Suavizado exponencial doble
  • TES: Suavizado exponencial triple

Más adelante analizaremos estos 4 métodos.

“H”: es opcional, permite modificar las escalas de los momentos temporales recogidos en el elemento “B” (aplicando logaritmo, exponentes, potencias).

  • En nuestra explicación no vamos a utilizar este elemento y vamos a considerar que el periodo temporal es continuo.
  • Si no va informado este elemento en la función no hay que indicarlo con una “,”

“I”: es opcional, permite modificar las escalas de los datos de la serie histórica (aplicando logaritmo, exponentes, potencias).

  • En nuestra explicación no vamos a utilizar este elemento y vamos a proyectar los datos históricos sin jugar con sus escalas.
  • Este elemento si no va en la función no hay que indicarlo con una “,”

Algunas consideraciones:

Esta función hay que utilizarla en un script de cálculo: NO se puede incluir como fórmula en un miembro del outline.

En el script de cálculo, esta función tiene que ir asociada a un miembro. Por ejemplo:

  • Ventas(
    • @TREND ( … );
  • )

La serie histórica de datos y la serie proyectada pueden tener distintos números de elementos:

  • Podemos tener 12 datos históricos y proyectar 6 datos futuros, o 12, o 18, o 24…

MÉTODOS

Essbase ofrece 4 modelos de proyección de series históricas. La utilización de uno u otro viene determinado por el conocimiento del analista y la lógica de la serie proyectada.

Un posible método de valoración de la idoneidad de un modelo puede venir determinado por aquel que haga mínimo el error cuadrático medio “MSE” (suma de diferencias al cuadrado entre los datos históricos y los que el modelo proyectaría para este periodo histórico).

  • Se suele utilizar la raíz cuadrada del error cuadrático medio (“RMSE”).

I.- LR

Regresión lineal.

Aplicamos la siguiente función: (tiene informado los elementos “A”, “D”, “F” y “G”)

  • Ventas(
    • @TREND(@LIST(“2016”->Ene,“2017”->Dic),,,@LIST(“2016_err”-> Ene,“2017_err”->Dic),,@LIST(“2018_est”->Ene,“2019_est”->Dic),LR);
  • )

Subimos los siguientes datos:

Cuya representación gráfica es:

Esta función proyecta la siguiente curva:

II.- SES

Suavizado exponencial simple.

En los modelos con suavizado exponencial (simple, doble o triple) los datos históricos reciben una ponderación decreciente:

  • Mientras más se alejan del presente menos ponderan en el cálculo del modelo.

El modelo SES no estima ni tendencia ni estacionalidad.

  • Se debe utilizar por tanto para proyectar series históricas que no muestren ni tendencia ni estacionalidad.

Este método puede llevar un parámetro “a” (opcional) que aplica al valor absoluto de los datos y determina como va disminuyendo hacía atrás la ponderación de los valores históricos.

  • El último dato de la serie histórica recibe la ponderación “a”
  • El penúltimo dato, la ponderación “a” * (1 – “a”)
  • El antepenúltimo dato, la ponderación “a” * (1 – “a”)^2

Este parámetro “a” puede tomar valores entre 0 y 1:

  • Mientras mayor sea el valor del parámetro mayor ponderación reciben los datos históricos más recientes y menos pesan los más antiguos.
  • Mientras menor sea su valor, los valores más antiguos van ganando peso en la estimación.

El conocimiento del analista es el que tiene que ir probando para ver qué valor de “a” es el que define un modelo de proyección más aceptable.

  • Si no se informa este párametro toma por defecto el valor de 0.2

Si se informa este parámetro se incorpora en la función a continuación del tipo de modelo:

  • @TREND(,,,,,,SES,0.5);

Veamos cómo ponderan los datos históricos en función del valor asignado a este parámetro “a” (consideremos una seri histórica con 12 datos):

Veamos un ejemplo de aplicación de este modelo:

Partimos de los siguientes datos históricos:

Vamos a aplicar dos funciones: la primera con los parámetros por defecto:

  • Ventas(
    • @TREND(@LIST(“2016”->Ene,“2017”->Dic),,,@LIST(“2016_err”-> Ene,“2017_err”->Dic),,@LIST(“2018_est”->Ene,“2019_est”->Dic),SES);
  • )

Y la segunda aplicando un parámetro a = 0,8:

  • Ventas(
    • @TREND(@LIST(“2016”->Ene,“2017”->Dic),,,@LIST(“2016_err”-> Ene,“2017_err”->Dic),,@LIST(“2018_est”->Ene,“2019_est”->Dic),SES,0.8);
  • )

Obteniendo las siguientes proyecciones:

  • 1ª función: Línea marrón
  • 2ª función: Línea gris

III.- DES

Suavizado exponencial doble.

Este método parte del modelo anterior pero tiene en cuenta también la tendencia, pero no valora si la serie histórica presenta estacionalidad.

  • Se debe utilizar por tanto para proyectar series históricas que muestran tendencia pero no estacionalidad.

Este método puede incorporar 2 parámetros; ambos pueden tomar valores entre 0 y 1:

“a”: es similar al del modelo anterior; si no se informa toma por defecto el valor 0.2

“b”: mide la tendencia de la serie; si no se informa toma por defecto el valor 0.3

  • Su funcionamiento es similar al del parámetro “a” sólo que aplicado a la tendencia de la serie: valores mayores ponderan más la tendencia más reciente que muestran los datos históricos, y valores menores permite que la tendencia que mostraban los datos más antiguos también participen en la determinación de la tendencia proyectada de la serie.

Si se informan estos parámetros se incluyen a continuación del modelo:

  • @TREND(,,,,,,DES,0.5,0.8);

Veamos un ejemplo: proyectamos los siguientes datos:

Vamos a aplicar dos funciones: la primera con los parámetros por defecto:

  • Ventas(
    • @TREND(@LIST(“2016”->Ene,“2017”->Dic),,,@LIST(“2016_err”-> Ene,“2017_err”-> Dic),,@LIST(“2018_est”->Ene,“2019_est”->Dic),DES);
  • )

Y la segunda aplicando un parámetro “a” = 0,1 y “b” = 0,5:

  • Ventas(
    • @TREND(@LIST(“2016”->Ene,“2017”->Dic),,,@LIST(“2016_err”-> Ene,“2017_err”->Dic),,@LIST(“2018_est”->Ene,“2019_est”->Dic),DES,0.1,0,5);
  • )

Obteniendo las siguientes proyecciones:

  • 1ª función: Línea marrón
  • 2ª función: Línea gris

Para analizar la bondad de estas estimaciones podemos analizar el parámetro RMSE (raíz cuadrada de la suma al cuadrado de los errores):

La primera función:

La segunda función:

Aunque es el experto el que debe valorar la bondad de estas estimaciones, la primera función se aproxima mejor a los datos históricos: el parámetro RMSE es menor.

IV.- TES

Suavizado exponencial triple.

Este método parte del anterior, pero incorpora además la estacionalidad.

  • Se debe utilizar por tanto para proyectar series históricas que muestran tendencia y estacionalidad.

Este método puede incorporar la frecuencia de la estacionalidad y 3 parámetros (que pueden tomar valores entre 0 y 1):

“T”: Frecuencia de la estacionalidad: indica la frecuencia con la que se presenta la estacionalidad:

  • Si los datos son mensuales y la estacionalidad se repite cada 12 meses tomaría el valor 12, si se repite trimestralmente tomaría el valor 4…

“a”: mide el valor absoluto de los datos; si no se informa toma por defecto el valor 0.2

  • Su funcionamiento es similar al de los modelos anteriores.

“b”: mide la tendencia de la serie; si no se informa toma por defecto el valor 0.5

  • Su funcionamiento es similar al del modelo anterior.

“c”: mide la estacionalidad de la serie; si no se informa toma por defecto el valor 0.1

  • Su funcionamiento es similar al de los parámetros anteriores sólo que interviene a la hora de determinar la estacionalidad de la serie: valores mayores ponderan más la estacionalidad mostrada en los datos históricos más recientes, y valores menores permite que la estacionalidad que mostraban los datos más antiguos también participen en la determinación de la estacionalidad proyectada de la serie.

Si se informan estos parámetros se incluyen a continuación del modelo:

  • @TREND(,,,,,,TES,12,0.5,0.8,0.2);

Veamos un ejemplo: partimos de los siguientes datos:

Que dibujan la siguiente gráfica:

Vemos que presenta cierta estacionalidad en los meses de marzo, por lo que es aplicable el modelo TES.

Vamos a aplicar dos funciones: la primera con los parámetros “a” = 0,3 / “b” = 0,3 / “c” = 0,9 y “T” = 12:

  • Ventas(
    • @TREND(@LIST(“2016”->Ene,“2017”->Dic),,,@LIST(“2016_err”-> Ene,“2017_err”->Dic),,@LIST(“2018_est”->Ene,“2019_est”-> Dic),TES,12,0.3,0.3,0.9);
  • )

La segunda con los parámetros “a” = 0,4 / “b” = 0,4 / “c” = 0,95 y “T” = 12:

  • Ventas(
    • @TREND(@LIST(“2016”->Ene,“2017”->Dic),,,@LIST(“2016_err”-> Ene,“2017_err”->Dic),,@LIST(“2018_est”->Ene,“2019_est”-> Dic),TES,12,0.4,0.4,0.95);
  • )

Estos conjuntos de parámetros los hemos seleccionado tras diferentes pruebas hasta obtener proyecciones relativamente lógicas. El modelo se puede mostrar muy sensible a los valores de estos parámetros.

Obteniendo las siguientes proyecciones:

  • 1ª función: Línea marrón
  • 2ª función: Línea gris

Para analizar la bondad de estas estimaciones, podemos analizar el parámetro RMSE:

La primera función:

La segunda función:

Aunque es el experto el que debe valorar la bondad de estas estimaciones, el segundo modelo se aproxima mejor a los datos históricos: el parámetro RMSE es menor.